PT Boat Forum


Moderated by: Dick, Jeff D

The PT Boat Forum ª PT Boats of WWII ª  PT Boats - General

Page: 1 of 1

Back to Topic Index Page 133 | Replies: 5

 Author  Topic: possible dumb topic
TED WALTHER

TOP BOSS
  

    
Post a Reply To This Topic    Reply With Quotes     Edit Message     View Profile of TED WALTHER   Send Email To TED WALTHER Posted on: Feb 15, 2012 - 7:57pm
I believe I have asked this of a few of you before, but......
I have viewed new photos of PT 309, PT 796, PT 617, and PT 658 and my question is: Why is the planking visible today, but in the 1941-1945 photos it is not visible in 99% of the photos? I am only speaking of the same perspective, such as hull and deck photos.
I am really asking this in a pure modelers perspective.
Take care,
TED
P.S. this might help in my PT 308 model.


Total Posts: 2930 | Joined: Oct 16, 2006 - 7:42am | IP Logged

  Jerry Gilmartin

TOP BOSS
  

    
Post a Reply To This Topic    Reply With Quotes     Edit Message     View Profile of Jerry Gilmartin   Send Email To Jerry Gilmartin Posted on: Feb 16, 2012 - 10:17pm
HI Ted.
I too have wondered about this same question. The only plausible answer that I have heard is this: Older wood shrinks with age and makes the joints between planks more pronounced. The joints were always there, but now they stand out more since the wood itself has changed. When it was new, it was smoother and easier to cover the smaller mismatches between planks with paint. Just my 2cents.
Jerry PT658 Portland OR

Jerry Gilmartin

Total Posts: 1285 | Joined: Oct 8, 2006 - 11:16pm | IP Logged

Frank J Andruss Sr

TOP BOSS
  

    
Post a Reply To This Topic    Reply With Quotes     Edit Message     View Profile of Frank J Andruss Sr   Send Email To Frank J Andruss Sr Posted on: Feb 17, 2012 - 1:29am
The boats and wood for that matter were made to be in the water. The properties of the salt keep the wood plyable. When the wood is exposed and dried for a number of years or less, it does shrink and change, causing joints to shrink and expand with weather conditions. With no maintenance, such as scraping and painting, this is what you will get with wooden boats.


Total Posts: 3269 | Joined: Oct 9, 2006 - 6:09am | IP Logged

Nuge210

TOP BOSS
  

    
Post a Reply To This Topic    Reply With Quotes     Edit Message     View Profile of Nuge210   Send Email To Nuge210 Posted on: Feb 17, 2012 - 8:27am
Guys,

I always thought that the lighting and the camera angle in a photo had a lot to do with seeing the planks or not. Never really thought about it too much. Check out the photo for March 2012 in the calendar from HQ. You can see some of the planking very well.

Steve

Total Posts: 322 | Joined: Jun 4, 2008 - 7:50am | IP Logged

Will Day

TOP BOSS
  

    
Post a Reply To This Topic    Reply With Quotes     Edit Message     View Profile of Will Day   Send Email To Will Day Posted on: Feb 17, 2012 - 9:16am
I agree, Nudge. I always thought lighting was a big part of it.

Will

Total Posts: 1953 | Joined: Oct 8, 2006 - 4:19pm | IP Logged

Nathaniel Smith

MASTER
  

    
Post a Reply To This Topic    Reply With Quotes     Edit Message     View Profile of Nathaniel Smith   Send Email To Nathaniel Smith Posted on: Feb 17, 2012 - 4:07pm
If you are also talking about decking ...these pictures are from the Elco movie I saw at Frank's Springfield PT Boat Exhibit. It shows the early decking as plywood.



natsmith

Total Posts: 211 | Joined: Jan 19, 2008 - 6:55am | IP Logged


Lock Topic

 

Forum Legend

New Member

Reply to topic

More than 25 posts | Full Member

Reply to topic with quoted message

More than 50 posts | Advanced Member

Edit Message

More than 150 posts | MASTER

View profile

More than 300 posts | TOP BOSS

Email member