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 Author  Topic: Searching for LT Arnold DeMond
Allan

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Post a Reply To This Topic    Reply With Quotes     Edit Message     View Profile of Allan   Send Email To Allan Posted on: May 4, 2008 - 6:21pm
DeMond served as XO on the 113 boat with LT Leary as the skipper as a part of Div. 17 in New Guinea. I would appreciate any information and / or photo of DeMond that you might be willing to share. He went on to be a career officer- not sure of his final rank.

Thanks- Allan


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Frank J Andruss Sr

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Post a Reply To This Topic    Reply With Quotes     Edit Message     View Profile of Frank J Andruss Sr   Send Email To Frank J Andruss Sr Posted on: May 4, 2008 - 8:04pm
Allen:

Demond was born in Los Angeles California on August 28, 1917. He served with Squadrons 4, 5,8, 12, and 37. He went to Mid-Shipmans School at Southern U in Chicago and was commissioned an Ensign on May 5, 1942.

He served with the MTBSTC and was assisned as XO of PT 113 with Ron 5 in August 1942. PT 113 was shipped with other boats on the new, large tanker, USS Suamico, which sailed from Norfolk VA, to Aruba, Panama, then to New Caledonia. PT 113 suffered severe damage and was towed to Austrailia for repairs. Demond was then assigned to Ron 8 as XO of PT 120, later to Ron 12 as CO of PT 152, then back to Melville as instructor-boat captain of PT 316 for a year.

He returned to the Pacific as Staff member , COMSOWESTPAC, and was later assigned to Ron 37 OPERATIONS OFFICER and CO of PT 544. Shortly after, Ron 37 was transported to Okinawa. The War ended that night their first scheduled patrol out of Teguchi Harbor was to be briefed.

Demond served over 30 years as an educator in the Alahambra (CA) City School District, eight years as a High School Counselor, 14 years as a Principle, where he retired and moved to San Clemente. During this time he was active with the Naval Reserve and retired in in 1967, with a permanent commission as Lieutenant Commander.

Demond and his wife raised three children. He spent his time on the beach, surfing at San Onofre, near Camp Pendelton. I do not have any information if he is still with us or not. He would be 91 years of age today.


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Allan

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Post a Reply To This Topic    Reply With Quotes     Edit Message     View Profile of Allan   Send Email To Allan Posted on: May 6, 2008 - 3:09pm
Thanks Frank.
I appreciate your response. It is near impossible to get any photos of any of those guys that commissioned the six boats that became Div. 17. Every once in a while I find a group photo of a crew on one of those boats but invariably, they were assigned after Div 17 was dissolved and reassigned to Ron 8. By then, all the original guys were rotated back to the States for assignments at MTBSTC. Clealry, I started this too late. But, better late than never. I have some good information that should make interesting reading when I get it put together. I'm concentrating only on those Div 17 guys. I'm telling you- they had it rough!! Low on fuel and ammo, no medicines, c-rations only (ate Spam for months on end) water when they could get it from local streams. Later Rons (after March, '43) had bases to work from and tenders that could move up with them along the east coast of New Guinea.
Allan


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Frank J Andruss Sr

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Post a Reply To This Topic    Reply With Quotes     Edit Message     View Profile of Frank J Andruss Sr   Send Email To Frank J Andruss Sr Posted on: May 6, 2008 - 3:27pm
Clearly those early MTB BOYS had it rough, as they cleared the way for other Rons. Those early days were tough as the PT Boats were essentially new to the War effort and what took place in the field were lessons learned for others. Bad Torpedoes, food, fuel, water, medicine were just a few of the hardships.

Finding out that a pitching, rolling PT Boat was not he best torpedo platform, these early warriors brought those problems to the forefront. Needing larger guns on the boats was another problem theee boys found out the hard way. In time, the boats started to prove their worth in the War Zone, but only after the early MTB BOYS brought that experience home. Not doubt there were problems with the boats thru-out the War, but these wooden wonders shaped up to be the best thing the US NAVY had to combat the enemy in shallow waters. Why Elco, Higgins, or Huckins never switched to another power-plant is not clear. They certainly did their share to stack the decks with weapons that could Combat the Barges in the Pacific, and switch over to a better torpedo in the MK-13. They gave the boats their much needed eyes at night with the invention of RADAR, and tried many other inventions to help the MTB BOYS even the score, why not change over from High Octaine Gas to Diesel.

Oh well, I could go on and on. Good luck in your quest. If I can help you in any way, give me a shout.........


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