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 Author  Topic: Looking for info on Naval Fleet Hospital 108
Steve Wilson

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Post a Reply To This Topic    Reply With Quotes     Edit Message     View Profile of Steve Wilson  Posted on: Feb 10, 2015 - 7:03pm
I am trying to find out where Naval Fleet Hospital #108 would have been located in February 1945. My uncle Harold (Pt 475!) was transferred to this hospital for a couple weeks just before Ron 32 left Stirling Island MTB Base 9 on Feb 15, 1945 for Espiritu Santo. I am not sure if this would have been a hospital ship or a location on land. Any help appreciated.

Steve Wilson

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TED WALTHER

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Post a Reply To This Topic    Reply With Quotes     Edit Message     View Profile of TED WALTHER   Send Email To TED WALTHER Posted on: Feb 11, 2015 - 5:30pm
Steve;
Fleet Hospital #108 was Guadalcanal and New Caledonia. I think Guadalcanal had a Detachment of the parent command which was at New Caledonia.
Take care,
TED


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Steve Wilson

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Post a Reply To This Topic    Reply With Quotes     Edit Message     View Profile of Steve Wilson  Posted on: Feb 11, 2015 - 6:58pm
Thanks again, Ted.
My research had shown a Fleet Hospital 105. at Noumea, New Caledonia.I could not find any number assigned to the one at Guadalcanal., but I see that there was one there, perhaps #108. I am going to go with that.
Thank you again, Sir, for all your help!

Steve Wilson

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  TED WALTHER

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Post a Reply To This Topic    Reply With Quotes     Edit Message     View Profile of TED WALTHER   Send Email To TED WALTHER Posted on: Feb 11, 2015 - 7:49pm
Steve;
Here is some "extra" reading:
In August 1943 the designation Mobile Hospital was changed to Fleet Hospital; new serial numbers were assigned by adding 100 to the old number, except for Mobile Hospitals 1 and 2, which became Fleet Hospitals 1 and 2 respectively.

The floor space of the quonset hut was 16 by 36 feet and of the Iceland hut 24 by 36 feet.

1. Base Hospital No. 2, Efate, New Hebrides, arrived at Villa, 4 May 1942. It was the first base hospital established in the Southwest Pacific. During the period 4 May 1942 to 31 December 1942 this hospital admitted 2,949 patients with malaria. Casualties from Guadalcanal were admitted to Base Hospital No. 2, usually within 36 hours after they were injured. Most of the patients were brought by air to an airfield 6 miles from the hospital. A quonset hut for the reception of patients was placed near the landing strip of the airfield and a medical officer supervised the transfer of patients from airplane to ambulance. In 1944 this hospital was moved to Noumea and in July 1945 to Subic Bay.

2. Mobile Hospital No. 3, in American Samoa, was one of the hospitals established in the Pacific in 1942 that did not receive a large number of battle casualties. In Samoa, filariasis was a major problem. Up to 1 January 1944, this hospital evacuated 2,904 patients with filariasis to the United States.

3. Mobile Hospital No. 5, later Fleet Hospital No. 105, arrived in Noumea in September 1942 and received its first patient on 22 April 1943. During the period from September 1942 to December 1945, 23,566 patients were admitted. The maximum patient census was 2,100.

4. Mobile Hospital No. 8, arrived on Guadalcanal in April 1943. It was commissioned August 1943 and designated as Fleet Hospital No. 108 in 1944. By December 1944 this hospital had treated 39,395 patients, During 1943, 2,208 patients were admitted for some form of psychoneurosis.

5. Mobile Hospital No. 12 was commissioned in September 1943 and decommissioned in November 1945. By receipt and transfer, about 1,400 officers and men served with this unit, but it never operated as a hospital and never admitted a patient. This hospital arrived at Noumea in May 1944; from there it was shipped to Guadalcanal, Espiritu Santo, Eniwetok, and finally Okinawa. It was never erected.

6. Fleet Hospital No. 114, a 1,000-bed unit, arrived at Samar, March 1945, and was expanded to 3,000 beds by incorporating Fleet Hospital No. 109. The hospital was operating on 2 July 1945 and 5,684 patients were admitted during the 2 months of July and August. This hospital had a strikingly high incidence of admissions for ureteral calculus, 117 admissions in 2 months. The widespread use of sulfonamides may have been a factor in this.

7.Base hospitals:
U.S. Naval Base Hospital No. 1, Londonderry, North Ireland
U.S. Naval Base Hospital No. 2, Efate Island, New Hebrides
U.S. Naval Base Hospital No. 3, Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides
U.S. Naval Base Hospital No. 4, Wellington, New Zealand; Okinawa
U.S. Naval Base Hospital No. 5, Casablanca, French Morocco
U.S. Naval Base Hospital No. 6, Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides
U.S. Naval Base Hospital No. 7, Tulagi, Solomon Islands
U.S. Naval Base Hospital No. 8, Pearl Harbor, T.H
U.S. Naval Base Hospital No. 9, Oran, Algeria
U.S. Naval Base Hospital No. 10, Sydney, Australia
U.S. Naval Base Hospital No. 11, Munda, New Georgia
U.S. Naval Base Hospital No. 13, Milne Bay, New Guinea
U.S. Naval Base Hospital No. 12, Netley, Hants, England
U.S. Naval Base Hospital No. 14, Finschhafen, New Guinea; Cavite, P.I.
U.S. Naval Base Hospital No. 15, Manus Island, Admiralty Islands
U.S. Naval Base Hospital No. 16, Woendi, Schouten Islands
U.S. Naval Base Hospital No. 17, Hollandia, New Guinea
U.S. Naval Base Hospital No. 18, Guam, Mariana Islands
U.S. Naval Base Hospital No. 19, Tinian Island, Mariana Islands
U.S. Naval Base Hospital No. 20, Peleliu, Palau Islands


Mobile hospitals:
U.S. Naval Mobile Hospital No. 1 in Guantanamo and Bermuda
U.S. Naval Mobile Hospital No. 2, Pearl Harbor (commissioned Aug 1941)
U.S. Naval Mobile Hospital No. 3, Tutuila, Samoa; Guam
U.S. Naval Mobile Hospital No. 5, Noumea, New Caledonia
U.S. Naval Mobile Hospital No. 7, Noumea, New Caledonia
U.S. Naval Mobile Hospital No. 8, Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands
U.S. Naval Mobile Hospital No. 4, Auckland, New Zealand
U.S. Naval Mobile Hospital No. 6, Wellington, New Zealand
U.S. Naval Mobile Hospital No. 9, Brisbane, Australia
U.S. Naval Mobile Hospital No. 10, Russell Islands, Solomon Islands
U.S. Naval Mobile Hospital No. 11, Guam, Mariana Islands
U.S. Naval Mobile Hospital No. 12, New Caledonia (Noumea)

Fleet hospitals:
U.S. Naval Fleet Hospital No. 103, Guam
U.S. Naval Fleet Hospital No. 113, San Francisco, Calif.
U.S. Naval Fleet Hospital No. 114, Samar, P.
U.S. Naval Fleet Hospital No. 115, Guam, Mariana Islands
U.S. Naval Fleet Hospital No. 116, Brooklyn, N Y.; San Pedro, Calif.
Hope this helps.
Take care,
TED





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Steve Wilson

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Post a Reply To This Topic    Reply With Quotes     Edit Message     View Profile of Steve Wilson  Posted on: Feb 11, 2015 - 8:11pm
Wow!
What a wealth of information you just passed along

With the help of you and the forum members I believe I have pieced together a fairly complete record of my Uncle Harold's PT service. The only thing missing is why he was admitted to the hospital, and after seeing the common diseases treated (aside from battle related injuries) I think it best not to try too hard to find out WHY. I have the WHEN and WHERE. I am calling it a day!
Thanks to all who have helped me on this search.



Steve Wilson

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TED WALTHER

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Post a Reply To This Topic    Reply With Quotes     Edit Message     View Profile of TED WALTHER   Send Email To TED WALTHER Posted on: Feb 12, 2015 - 8:38am
Steve'
He was probably showing signs of malaria or maybe dysentery. This would cover the weeks you are talking about.This was common for them to be treated and then when determined "healthy" the were sent back to their respective squadrons.
Take care,
TED


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Steve Wilson

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Post a Reply To This Topic    Reply With Quotes     Edit Message     View Profile of Steve Wilson  Posted on: Feb 12, 2015 - 10:23am
Thanks Ted.

I had heard that malaria and dysentery were fairly common in that area of the South Pacific
.
Whatever he had, I am glad he got it taken care of and got back to the squadron. Again, I appreciate all your help on this.


Steve Wilson

Total Posts: 27 | Joined: Feb 2, 2015 - 12:28am | IP Logged


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