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 Author  Topic: BINOCULARS
victorkchun

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Post a Reply To This Topic    Reply With Quotes     Edit Message   Posted on: Jul 9, 2011 - 10:10pm
It occurred to me that the binoculars used by the Navy in WW II were individual focus rather than central focus. In my experience I found the central focus is easier and faster in spotting "target". Why the Navy prefers the individual focus. May be some of you vets can answer that. Thanks.
Victor

Victor K Chun

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Frank J Andruss Sr

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Post a Reply To This Topic    Reply With Quotes     Edit Message     View Profile of Frank J Andruss Sr   Send Email To Frank J Andruss Sr Posted on: Jul 10, 2011 - 3:13am
Victor

I am pretty sure it had to deal with the binoculars being nearly moisture proof, simple, and sturdy in construction. Also that type Binocular was better for distance, which increased visual accuracy. If one Sailor used the Binoculars, he could simply focus each eyepiece on infinity, and note the settings. Some would even tape the eyepieces to insure settings were correct.. I think the resolution was better as well.............


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Jeff D

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Post a Reply To This Topic    Reply With Quotes     Edit Message     View Profile of Jeff D   Send Email To Jeff D Posted on: Jul 10, 2011 - 7:07am
They also seemed to be in short supply (at the start of war involvement?) according to this poster (sorry but don't know the date or source):





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Gary Szot

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Post a Reply To This Topic    Reply With Quotes     Edit Message     View Profile of Gary Szot   Send Email To Gary Szot Posted on: Jul 11, 2011 - 11:18am
Did the Navy use US Army issue binoculars?
My dad brought home an Army issue Bausch and Lomb 8 x 56.
Each eyepiece has its own focus ring.


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Frank J Andruss Sr

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Post a Reply To This Topic    Reply With Quotes     Edit Message     View Profile of Frank J Andruss Sr   Send Email To Frank J Andruss Sr Posted on: Jul 11, 2011 - 1:52pm
Gary

A shortage of Binoculars would certainly lead one to grab a pair of whatever could be used. I'm pretty sure, you would find more then one boat with Army Binoculars onboard..........Remember, these guys were natural scroungers, and would pick up whatever they could get.


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newsnerd99

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Post a Reply To This Topic    Reply With Quotes     Edit Message   Posted on: Jul 12, 2011 - 1:05am
Pop's bring backs included SARD Mk43 6x42 binoculars and I forget who made the Mark II 16 power "Spyglass" style long tube telescope.

I don't know if he took from PT stores or they walked away during his time in the reserves or his Korean call-up...

Grandson of James J Stanton
RON 15 PT 209 and RON 23 PT 243
Check out: www.pistolpackinmama.net

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newsnerd99

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Post a Reply To This Topic    Reply With Quotes     Edit Message   Posted on: Jul 12, 2011 - 1:06am
Pop's bring backs included SARD Mk43 6x42 binoculars and I forget who made the Mark II 16 power "Spyglass" style long tube telescope.

I don't know if he took from PT stores or they walked away during his time in the reserves or his Korean call-up...

Grandson of James J Stanton
RON 15 PT 209 and RON 23 PT 243
Check out: www.pistolpackinmama.net

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Nuge210

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Post a Reply To This Topic    Reply With Quotes     Edit Message     View Profile of Nuge210   Send Email To Nuge210 Posted on: Jul 14, 2011 - 6:20pm
Must have been a number of different models and powers. My fathers were Bausch & Lomb
7 x 50 and both eye pieces adjusted. Also marked :
U.S. Navy Bu Ships
Mark II, Mod. 0
No. 26920, 1941



Steve

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victorkchun

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Post a Reply To This Topic    Reply With Quotes     Edit Message   Posted on: Jul 14, 2011 - 8:18pm
Was that the binoculars that was damaged by enemy fire in the picture you sent me? Any
way Bausch & Lomb made the best binoculars in this country during WW II.
Victor

Victor K Chun

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Gary Paulsen

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Post a Reply To This Topic    Reply With Quotes     Edit Message     View Profile of Gary Paulsen   Send Email To Gary Paulsen Posted on: Jul 15, 2011 - 6:25am
Came across this bit of history on the internet.

"In 1912, William Bausch, another son of John Jacob, began an experimental glass laboratory. (Until this time, almost all optical-quality glass was imported from Europe.) Bausch & Lomb soon became the first American producer of optical-quality glass. By the end of 1917, the company was producing upwards of 40,000 pounds of this glass per month, fulfilling more than two-thirds of the government's wartime requirements for glass for binoculars, rifle scopes, telescopes, and search lights. Optical glass was produced in the company's Glass Plant in Rochester until the summer of 1986."

It may be that there were a lot of WW1 military surplus glasses that met the spec's of the military in civilian hands at the time.

Gary


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