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 Author  Topic: Color of Elco mufflers
victorkchun

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Post a Reply To This Topic    Reply With Quotes     Edit Message   Posted on: Feb 26, 2009 - 1:03pm
I have seen beautifully painted Elco PT boat models showing the
mufflers in silverish color. I was told at speed the paint will burnt off, thus showing tge bare metal color. However, I know at 10 knots the
butterfly valves were opened to allow the exhause to vent above water
and not through the mufflers. Can someone shed some light on this.
Also I have never seen a picture of Elco PT boat with bare metal
muffler. What's the answer?

Victor K Chun

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BobPic

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Post a Reply To This Topic    Reply With Quotes     Edit Message   Posted on: Feb 26, 2009 - 2:08pm
Victor: I am not an authority and I bet there were different situations with different boats. This pertains to the ron 10 boats in general and the PT167 in particular. Our mufflers were painted green to the water line. The hot gasses cooked the paint and it wasn't pretty for very long, although I don't remember any silver color. The butterflies had to be open when any throttle was applied or the forces would blow them off and damage the muffler. This happened frequently, the helmsman would go from idle, mufflers on, to full throttle before the MotorMac could open the butterflies. On our boat the MoMacs gave first priority to getting the engines in forward gear and opening the mufflers next. Some boats gave priority on opening the mufflers before putting the engines in forward. The danger here was that the helmsman would apply throttle while the engine was in neutral, a bad situation.


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QM

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Post a Reply To This Topic    Reply With Quotes     Edit Message   Posted on: Feb 26, 2009 - 6:42pm
I am not certain, but I believe the mufflers were copper color. We usually patrolled close inshore with the mufflers closed for stealth. I can't remember the speed limit on closed mufflers, but those six large cylinders on each muffler could easily blow them out.

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QM

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Post a Reply To This Topic    Reply With Quotes     Edit Message   Posted on: Feb 28, 2009 - 7:02am
" All Hands" November, 2008, Page 26. Here is a picture showing the mufflers painted the same as the hull above the waterline.

Some time ago there was some discussion regarding the Union Jack. This picture shows two boats flying the Union Jack an the bow.


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Drew Cook

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Post a Reply To This Topic    Reply With Quotes     Edit Message     View Profile of Drew Cook  Posted on: Mar 1, 2009 - 4:45am
Victor, it seems pretty obvious, from photos and film footage, that the mufflers were painted the same color as the rest of the boats' hulls and topsides (above the waterline), and the color of the bottom paint (usually red copperoid) below the waterline.

I've had your book for some years, Victor, and really enjoy it -- particularly the photos never published anywhere else, like those two on page 21 of the results of the B-25/PT friendly-fire incident of July 20, 1943 in which Barney Ross's PT 166 was sunk. What a find!

The other photo on page 21, of PT 68 and PT 143 on board the transport Stanvac Capetown, is great too. A lot of amidships-forward detail on those boats can be seen in it.

Thank you for your work.


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