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 Author  Topic: To C Marin Faure
Russell Pullano

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Post a Reply To This Topic    Reply With Quotes     Edit Message     View Profile of Russell Pullano   Send Email To Russell Pullano Posted on: Feb 11, 2009 - 6:51pm
Mr. Faure, As I was shuffling back among old message board's posts, I see that no one replyed to your post (January 2007) asking for PT boat language. If you are still around and are still interested, I can give you a very few words that were used in the navy (and also on the boats) .
If you reply to this post and send me your e-mail address, I'll contact you offline of this board.


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Allan

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Post a Reply To This Topic    Reply With Quotes     Edit Message     View Profile of Allan   Send Email To Allan Posted on: Feb 11, 2009 - 7:06pm
Russ:

Please consider posting your Navy jargon here for each of us to enjoy. I have always had a love for the language of the sea. I'll "heave to" and await your decision.

Allan


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G R Powell

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Post a Reply To This Topic    Reply With Quotes     Edit Message   Posted on: Feb 13, 2009 - 5:07am
Russ,

I would also like to hear your answer. What slang did you use on the boat? Did you call parts of the boat by other names than might be in a construction manual? What about other crew members -- how did you refer to them? Where there nicknames for certain ranks? What did you call the skipper? Also, what commands might you hear from the skipper while in operation? This is very helpful for those of us in the 21st century in trying to picture what occured on those boats 65 or so years ago. Thanks very much.

G R Powell

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QM

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Post a Reply To This Topic    Reply With Quotes     Edit Message   Posted on: Feb 13, 2009 - 2:18pm
The best that I can remember is that we usually called other enlisted men by their last names or sometimes a short version of their last name as Steve for Stevenson. A red head might be called Red. The skipper was usually called Mr. or Skipper. Other officers were called Mr. Occasionally an officer was called by his first name or a nickname. The cook was sometimes called Cookie. There were some common navy names for various rates--sparks for radioman, wheels for quartermaster, cookie for cook. To repeat, we usually used last names. Torpedos were sometimes called fish. We usually used the standard navy terminology for parts of the boat and equipment. Refer to a Bluejacket Manual. I no longer have mine

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Russell Pullano

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Post a Reply To This Topic    Reply With Quotes     Edit Message     View Profile of Russell Pullano   Send Email To Russell Pullano Posted on: Feb 14, 2009 - 7:42pm
Hi, I guess QM answered most of your questions.

However, what I was referring to was normal navy talk of that era.
We called the drinking fountain a "scuttlebut" Also, when referring to gossip, or latest rumors, or news, we also referred to that as "scuttlebut" probbly because gathering at the fountain was where most of the verbage occurred.
Candy was called "pogy bait". Draw your own conclusions about that one. The most unusual one was ice cream. I don't know why, but it was
"Geedunk". When talking to another shipmate you might refer to the skipper as "The old man"I guess you all know that a bed was a sack and sleeping was "sack time" Of course coffee was "Jo" You must know that the bathroom was the "head". The ropes were "lines"
In some photos you may have seen the braided lines that looked like minature airships, used to prevent the boats from banging agaionst the docks or between the moored boats. The name for those was "fenders". Also, I don't know exactly how to describe it, but a braided ball ( I believe it was made from the end of clothes line rope) was attached to the end of a line that would be thrown a longer distance, to a ship or a dock for mooring, was called a "monkey fist". You all know that the alcohol in the torpedoes was "torpedo juice" You also know that depth charges were "ash cans" The ocean was the "drink". The jail was the "brig" Pardon my English, but cheese was "tight ass". I guess you all know what "shit on the shingles" is
Oh well, time for me to shut up.
That-s some of what I remember.


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Russell Pullano

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Post a Reply To This Topic    Reply With Quotes     Edit Message     View Profile of Russell Pullano   Send Email To Russell Pullano Posted on: Feb 14, 2009 - 8:25pm
To add to my last post. Replying to G R Powell.
On the boats that I ws on , we differed slightly from QM's post. On the 162 boat, we had "Gimpy" O'neil (I never knew his first name)....there was "Fagan", (Robert Galant), and "Knot head" ( idon't think I knew his first or last name. My parents wer original from Italy, but for some unknown reason the skipper called me "Elgreeko"
On the 195 boat, there was "Hap" (Harold Deyo)....."Frenchie" ((Duplantis)... ... "Moe" (Creighton)....."Moose" (Cal Buras)


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cmfaure

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Post a Reply To This Topic    Reply With Quotes     Edit Message   Posted on: Mar 7, 2009 - 1:34pm
Russell--

I was in on a one month assignment in China when your message came in. I would like to talk with you about some of the language used in the Navy during WWII. I will respond to the e-mail you sent.

Thanks much,

Marin

C. Marin Faure

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